The increased serum level of sRAGE is associated with multiple sclerosis but not with disability progression
Cierny Daniel1, Michalik Jozef3, Hanysova Sandra2, Kantorova Ema3, Skerenova Maria1, Kurca Egon3, Dobrota Dusan2, Lehotsky Jan2
1Comenius University in Bratislava, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin and University hospital Martin, Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Martin
2Comenius University in Bratislava, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Department of Medical Biochemistry and BioMed, Martin
3Comenius University in Bratislava, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin and University Hospital Martin, Department of Neurology, Martin

Objective: It is still unclear as to why there are such large inter-individual variations in the risk and rate of disease disability progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). MS is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, with the involvement of autoimmunity, and inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. In these processes, the important biologic function of receptors for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) could be altered by its circulating soluble form (sRAGE). The aim of our study was to investigate the possible role of sRAGE in the etiopathogenesis and disability progression of MS. Methods: The serum level of sRAGE was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 44 patients with MS (22 rapidly progressing and 22 slow progressing) and 32 healthy controls from Slovakia. Results: We showed a significantly increased serum level of sRAGE in patients with MS in comparison with the controls. We found no statistically significant differences in serum levels of sRAGE between the MS subgroup with rapid and slow disease disability progression, which was measured using the MSSS score. Conclusions: Our results suggest a role of sRAGE in the etiopathogenesis of MS, but there was no association with disease disability progression. Further studies in larger cohorts of patients are necessary to clarify the exact mechanisms of the role of sRAGE in MS and its progression.

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